Currently Reading

Considering it’s been about 4 years since my latest update, you can guess that I’ve read a few books.  I can’t say exactly how many I’ve read and which ones, but let’s just say that on Goodreads.com, I have set a yearly goal of 36 books on average to read per year, and I’ve hit my goal for at least 2015 and 2016.  That’s 72+ books!  I can’t even recall all that I’ve read, let alone comment on them all, so I’ll just start anew with my current reading obsessions.

If you’ve heard of “Bones”, the Fox TV series with Temperance Brennan and Sealy Booth, you may know that the show is based of a series of novels by Kathy Reichs.  I’ve read the first in the Tempe Brennan series, some time earlier this year.  I plan to read more in that series.  The current Kathy Reichs series that I’m reading is a young adult/teen series.  I admit, I still refuse to grow up!  The series is about “Virals” – 4 kids who get infected by an altered parvo virus.  After they recovered from the ill affects of the virus, they found they have canine-like abilities, since they contracted the disease from an infected wolf-dog.  The abilities include exceptional hearing, sight, smell (Tori can literally smell fear and other emotions), strength, and speed.  Anyway, I just started “reading” the 4th book in the series.  Yeah, you may say that I’ve been enjoying the series.  One thing I find especially refreshing about the young adult series that I read is the fact that since the authors aren’t trying to hook in as many adults as possible, they avoid the typical hooks of graphic violence, sex, and profanity.  There is plenty of adventure in the Virals series, but reading these books doesn’t leave me feeling talked down to.

The other book I’m currently reading is H.G. Wells’ The Time Machine.  I’m almost done with it, and I have to say it is nothing like I expected.  (Which is probably why I’ve been almost done with it for over a month now.) 🙂  This book is mostly a narrative of the main character who invented the time machine and traveled forward in time something like 80,000+ years and it’s his monologue of what he experienced in the “future.”  Even though the book was originally published in 1895, Wells had a good ability for describing the imaginary ability to travel through time.  The dialog/monologue of the text doesn’t feel like other late-19th-century works, which honestly surprised me somewhat.

I should probably clarify – when I’m “reading” multiple books at the same time it is usually because I listen to some books in my car while I’m driving and other books I am actually seeing words on paper (or Kindle screen or iPhone screen – you get it).  I’ve actually found it easy to keep the stories separate from each other, even when the books I’m reading in tandem aren’t a teen series and a 19th century novel. 🙂

I’ll probably come back at a later date and talk about some of the other series that I’ve read in the past year or so, as well as some really good standalone novels that I’ve read (such as Stephen King’s 11-22-63 – one of my favorite most recent books.)  11-22-63 is what inspired me to read The Time Machine, and it also served somewhat as inspiration to King to write his novel.  If you didn’t already guess, 11-22-63 revolves around the time of JFK’s assassination.

More to come!

Recycling

In order to be “green”, everyone is supposed to be recycling. I get it – we have a recycle bin at home that gets picked up by our trash company every other week. My rant, however, is not with this service. My wife and I both own home-based businesses, and lately, that means we get a lot of boxes shipped to our home/home office. We end up with lots of cardboard boxes in our garage.

Today, I decided it was time to get rid of the latest batch. They’re all broken down flat and sitting in the back of my car. I’ve spent probably close to an hour trying to find a location where I can drop them off for recycling. Keep in mind, I live in the Denver area. I was surprised at what I found.

* there are very few locations that I found online that accept cardboard
* none were close to where I live or near my office
* most of those that I found had unaccommodating business hours (I work until 5, yet have to have these boxes across town before 5)
* I can pay to have someone come by and pick up the boxes

I don’t necessarily want to get paid for recycling my cardboard, but I don’t want it all taking up space in a landfill.  And I’m not going to pay a company lots of dollars to pick up my cardboard and then turn around and sell it.

If we are supposed to be “green”, and Denver and Colorado want to be eco-friendly, it shouldn’t take hours of searching to find a recycle location that is accessible, only to find out that the convenience factor is non-existent.  This round of boxes is headed for landfill, once again.